The Intermediate Player’s Case

 

Screw Driver- for any screws that start popping out

Screw Driver- for any screws that start popping out

 

 

 

Rubber Bands- in case your ligature bends or breaks.

Rubber Bands- in case your ligature bends or breaks.

 Rubber Bands– in case your ligature bends or breaks. This is especially the case in a crazy band room where you might accidentally drop your ligature and someone steps on it. :(

 

Mirror to check your embouchure.

Mirror to check your embouchure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Four Working Reeds in a Reed case!!! Here is a link to the new Vandoren reed cases as sold through Weinermusic. They are quite nice!

New Vandoren Reed Case

Vandoren Reed Case (Old School)

Old School Vandoren Clarinet Reed Case. Time to step up from the simple little reed cases that leave the reeds open to the environment.

Cork Grease– for tenon corks so that you may assemble clarinet easier

Cork Grease on Lower Joint

 

Swab- Take mouthpiece off, run string through bottom of clarinet and pull out of barrel.

Silk Swab- Take mouthpiece off, run string through bottom of clarinet and pull out of barrel

Thumb Rest Pad A.K.A. “Thumbie”- to ease pressure on right thumb

Silk SwabSilk will not expand like cotton. If you are still using that polyester rectangle that came with your clarinet “cleaning pack,” it’s time to toss that.

For mouthpiece– wipe with swab separately. Just use the cloth portion. You want to avoid dragging the string or the weight attached to the string through the mouthpiece.

 

 

Mouthpiece patches allow you to have a firm grip on your mouthpiece. When your upper teeth sit on the mouthpiece without a mouthpiece patch, you’ll notice that the mouthpiece wiggles around in your mouth. This keeps the teeth in place.

Mouthpiece Patch- goes on top of mouthpiece for better grip with teeth. You may use electric tape but only temporarily.

Mouthpiece Patch- goes on top of mouthpiece for better grip with teeth. You may use electric tape but only temporarily.

PENCIL !!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For A Wooden Horn:

Oildepending on climate and on how new the horn is. There are lots of arguments about oiling a wooden horn. I am for it. Once you start oiling it though, you can’t stop. Here in El Paso, I oil my clarinet about every 3-4 weeks. My clarinet is about a year and a half old. Once I start to see the wood grain inside of the instrument then I add a little oil. There are bore oilers but they leave a lot of fuzz inside your horn. It is better to do it with a cloth wrapped around a pencil or even a plastic flute tuning rod. Don’t put too much on. It shouldn’t drip from the sections but just thinly coat the inside of the parts (except for the mouthpiece because they are made of hard rubber).

Humidifiers to keep horn from drying. The humidifiers just go in the case not through the joints! The inside of your instrument remains humid from the last time you played, as long as you play everyday :D.

METRONOME/TUNER–Several music stores have these as a combo now.  

Clarinet Stand. This is for the clarinet itself. Some clarinet stands are a little too bulky for the clarinet case but you can always tie a make-up bag to your case and put the stand in there. Some stands are more compact and will fit in the case, however, I find these to be less reliable. My recommendation is the K&M Clarinet Stand. Here’s a link to this fabulous thing! K&M Clarinet Stand

Awesome collapsible clarinet stand! Take care of it. This thing is really nifty!

Awesome collapsible clarinet stand! Take care of it. This thing is really nifty!

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